March 4, 2014 

If we are to be in Christ new creatures, we must show that we are so, by having new ways of living in the world. If we are to follow Christ, it must be in our common way of spending every day.

It was this general intention that made the primitive Christians such eminent instances of piety, and made the goodly fellowship of the saints, and all the glorious army of martyrs and confessors. And if you will here stop, and ask yourselves, why you are not as pious as the primitive Christians were, your own heart will tell you, that it is neither through ignorance nor inability, but purely because you never thoroughly intended it. You observe the same Sunday worship that they did; and you are strict in it, because it is your full intention to be so. And when you as fully intend to be like them in their ordinary common life, when you intend to please God in all your actions, you will find it as possible, as to be strictly exact in the service of the Church. And when you have this intention to please God in all your actions, as the happiest and best thing in the world, you will find in you as great an aversion to everything that is vain and impertinent in common life, whether of business or pleasure, as you now have to anything that is profane. You will be as fearful of living in any foolish way, either of spending your time, or your fortune, as you are now fearful of neglecting the public worship.

Now, who that wants this general sincere intention, can be reckoned a Christian? And yet if it was among Christians, it would change the whole face of the world: true piety, and exemplary holiness, would be as common and visible, as buying and selling, or any trade in life.

A SERIOUS CALL TO A DEVOUT AND HOLY LIFE:Adapted to the State and Condition of all Orders of Christians by WILLIAM LAW, A.M.,Ch 2, pg 12-13

A SERIOUS CALL TO A DEVOUT AND HOLY LIFE:Adapted to the State and Condition of all Orders of Christians by WILLIAM LAW, A.M.,Ch 2, pg 11-12

The Great Evangelical Revival of 1738 owed its first impetus to The Serious Call by William Law more than to any other. Its great impact was felt greatest on the church in England.  John Wesley remained deeply influenced by the Serious Call throughout his life. John Newton and Thomas Scott expressed their gratitude for the thoughts provoked by the Serious Call.